You may be considering taking a drive down Massachusetts highways with just a few drinks under your belt, assuming you can make it home safely without causing an accident and without being caught. You would be surprised how many people make that decision, and how often it ends in catastrophe or in a DWI charge. Rather than taking that risk, educate yourself on the average statistics of driver danger. But how many people really drive drunk, anyway?

According to Mass.gov, no fewer than two percent of any drivers on the road at any given time are driving under the influence. That means if you pass a hundred cars while on the highway, which is not difficult to do in crowded city or highway traffic, at least two of the drivers around you are likely under the influence and posing a danger to other drivers. Statistics also suggest that each repeat offender drives under the influence at least 80 times per year, so that any one DWI offender is rarely a one-time danger.

Statistics are harder to gauge regarding the number of people who drive under the influence, period, versus the number of drivers driving under the influence at a specific given time. The state of Massachusetts estimates at least one in four drivers have committed and continue to commit DUI offenses over the course of their lifetimes as driving adults. Statistics regarding DWIs are notably higher on weekends, particularly on Friday and Saturday nights.

This information is provided as a resource only, and should not be misconstrued as legal advice or admissible legal counsel.