According to the CDC, between 2003 and 2012, 1,370 people lost their lives due to alcohol-impaired drivers in Massachusetts. Sometimes these people were passengers in the vehicle, other drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. Other times, it was the driver themselves.

The CDC estimates that the death rate per 100,000 across all age groups is 1.8 in Massachusetts. The national average is much higher at 3.3. The national average is highest for the age groups 21 to 34, at 6.7 deaths per 100,000 population. In contrast, Massachusetts stood at 3.3 for the same age group.

Men are also overwhelmingly more likely to die from car accidents involving alcohol than women. The death rate in Massachusetts was 2.7, but 5.2 at the national average. In contrast, women’s death rates stood at 0.9 in Massachusetts and 1.5 for the national average.

The greatest irony of these numbers is that 2.2% of residents in Massachusetts reported that they have operated a vehicle after drinking too much. Meanwhile, the national average sits at 1.9%. It is not clear how the death rates remain lower than the national average in light of this.

This is perhaps why Massachusetts continues to take impaired driving so seriously. According to Mass,gov, the state runs biannual . One just started on August 14th and will continue through to Labor Day. This involves a zero-tolerance patrol by local police officers who target drivers impaired by legal and illegal substances.

The state also plans to pair an educational campaign alongside this. Entitled the Commonwealth intends for it to shed light on the impact marijuana may have on a person’s ability to drive safely.