An OUI can lead to serious consequences, but what should drivers do when the governor allows for “cocktails to go?” This change allows restaurants an opportunity to sell mixed drinks and alcohol in sealed containers to take-out customers, but that could increase a risk of drunk driving.

As a driver, it’s very important to understand how being in possession of alcohol in your vehicle could impact you. There are still open container laws, and if you are driving dangerously, you could be accused of an OUI even if you haven’t been drinking.

The new allowance for take-out alcohol does require that restaurants sell no more than 64 ounces of mixed drinks per transaction, which should limit their liability. However, there is still a risk to those who have alcohol in their vehicles on the way home.

What should you do if you’re transporting alcohol home with your take-out meal?

If you’re planning to take your alcohol home with you, there are two essential rules to follow. The first is to keep those containers sealed. Open container laws can lead to arrests and fines, so you don’t want to be caught with alcohol open in your vehicle.

Secondly, it’s a good idea to keep alcohol out of your reach during the ride. If you have alcohol in the front seat or in a cup holder, you could draw suspicion from any officer who pulls you over.

It’s legal to get alcohol to go, but be cautious what you do once you have it in your possession. If you aren’t, you could end up facing OUI charges or claims of drinking and driving that you don’t deserve.